Gaming Reviews

Published on November 16th, 2017 | by gareth

2

Neofeud

Some of the most popular games to be released in the mid 80’s to mid 90’s were the point and click adventure games.  Sierra Online ruled the 80’s with games such as Kings Quest and Leisure Suit Larry, while the 90’s was dominated by Lucasarts with their release of titles such as Day of the Tentacle and Full Throttle.  These games were puzzle driven stories, where the main character interacted with their environment by clicking on items, pressing a button, and occasional mini games to complete the level.  Sadly, except for very few remastered greats, there has been little to be excited about in this once popular and well-loved genre.  This is where Neofued hopes to fill the gap with its mix of Blade Runner and District 9 storyline.

Neofeud is set in the not too distant future, a dystopian society where 1% of the wealthy Pureblood human megacorporation’s live in floating cities, and the other 99%, a mix of humans (Pure or otherwise), cyborgs and androids are barely able scrape by.  Purebloods (those completely human) hold down low wage jobs, where those from the mechanical genepool (robots, androids, etc.) are treated as lower class citizens, living in Section 8 housing and off government food stamps.

You are Karl Carbon, a dishonorably discharged cop who now makes a living as social worker for Sentient Services.  Karl is tasked by his boss (who for better or worse looks and sounds a lot like Emilio Estevez) to travel to a local ghetto to checkup on Johnny, an at-risk youth (artificial person).  This will catapult Karl into an adventure, with a gangsta robot named Proto-J and Princess Cybil, a wealthy aristocrat who believes in equality for all sentient beings.  Karl also travels to “The Arcade”, where robot gangsters and drug dealers hang out, and will even do a little time-traveling, but not more than 24 hours.

The game play is standard fare for this type of genre.  The cursor can be changed from an eye icon to look at an item or object, hand icon to use an item, you get the idea.  You collect various items that you then use on something in the environment to advance the story.  Find a door knob on the ground?  There will certainly be a door missing a knob to use it on.  For any who have played point and click games in the past, the controls will be second nature to you.

The visuals are good, they aren’t great, but they are vibrant and gritty.  There is a mix of 2D and 3D objects in the environment to tell the story.  You will see lots of nods to the 80’s if you look close enough…”You made a time machine out of a DeLorean?”,  Yes Marty, he did.  I feel that someone familiar enough with classic 80’s movies will get more out of these little quips than those less familiar.  That isn’t to say you can’t appreciate the game without this knowledge, you’ll just be missing a lot of the inside jokes that abound.

The voice acting is a mixed bag here.  Some of the characters nail the dialog and help with character development.  Unfortunately, the main character Karl tends to deliver an inconsistent performance which can seriously distract you during key moments in the game.  That being said though, all the characters are voiced (no reading endless dialog boxes as you did in the 80’s) which is an achievement for any game.  So while the voice acting isn’t always amazing, it’s still preferred to reading line after line of text when the characters speak.

The game clocks in around 15 hours, which is a pretty astonishing feat when you realize that the story, gameplay and art work was all done by one guy.

Is the game worth $14.99 on Steam?  That depends on your nostalgia for a point and click adventure with a lot of references to 80’s films.  The story is interesting, albeit a bit convoluted at times, and the characters range from likeable to annoying, but still have you rooting for them until the end.

3.5 out of 5 stars

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2 Responses to Neofeud

  1. Thanks a lot for this great review of Neofeud, Gareth!

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